When did orthodontics begin?

In 1669, the French dentist Pierre Fauchard, who is often credited with inventing modern orthodontics, published a book entitled The Surgeon Dentist on methods of straightening teeth. Modern braces were invented in 1819 by Christophe-Francois Delabarre.

When did orthodontics begin?

In 1669, the French dentist Pierre Fauchard, who is often credited with inventing modern orthodontics, published a book entitled The Surgeon Dentist on methods of straightening teeth. Modern braces were invented in 1819 by Christophe-Francois Delabarre. The French had evolved the field of dentistry in the 1700s, with notable advances that included personalized mouth guards and the removal of wisdom teeth to achieve overcrowding. However, it was Delabarre who created the precursor of braces as we know them today.

He devised a woven wire or 'cradle' fitted over the upper and lower teeth and was used for an extended period of time to straighten the teeth over time. At the beginning of the 20th century, the term became popular. However, braces were still expensive and not everyone could afford them. Dentists would wrap bands made of assorted materials around the teeth, which would then be connected by a cable.

Most dentists would use ivory, copper, or zinc as cables. But patients who could afford expensive treatments preferred silver or gold wires. Although gold wires would require frequent adjustments, as gold softens due to heat. The Surgeon Dentist documented numerous topics in general dentistry, but what made the book stand out in the world was a particular chapter dedicated to orthodontics.

Traditional orthodontic appliances are usually worn for two to two and a half years, depending on the extent of orthodontic treatment needed. Today, with new technologies available, people of all ages choose orthodontic treatment to achieve a beautiful and healthy smile. Beginning in 1880, Edward Hartley Angle, considered by many to be the father of modern orthodontics, identified the true properties of malocclusions, or misalignments, of teeth and jaws. Angle firmly believed that, due to its complexity, orthodontics required specialized training, and later established the first graduate program dedicated exclusively to orthodontics.

Although modern orthodontics generally involves a slight discomfort at most, this has not always been the case. They found that teeth move after orthodontic treatment by not using the plastic retainer. The American Orthodontic Association, which is the organization that presides over orthodontists in the United States, has released some dramatic statistics regarding the popularity of orthodontic appliances in today's society. The moment a dentist recommended seeing an orthodontist, the words “metal mouth”, tin teeth, and other unattractive adjectives crossed people's minds.

Orthodontic treatment used to be considered “cosmetic,” but today, dentists and patients alike realize that orthodontic treatment can be a necessity. In the past, orthodontic treatment was reserved for rich people or patients with extreme deformities of the teeth and jaws. Before the 1970s, orthodontists wrapped metal around teeth because they lacked dental adhesives. Orthodontists predict that the popularity of seeking orthodontic treatment will only increase as both the cost and duration of treatment decrease.

In fact, there have been so many advances in the techniques used that it is difficult to imagine that, after almost 3,000 years of progress, there may be room for growth in the world of orthodontics, but there is. Even orthodontic appliances in the 1950s did not show much change, although the practice became more common and orthodontists became increasingly skilled at wrapping teeth with metal. However, it was the occlusion (bite) that gave orthodontics its scientific basis and the reason it has progressed to the advanced technology available today with traditional metal braces, transparent braces and transparent aligners called Invisalign. .

Margie Murayama
Margie Murayama

Typical web enthusiast. Infuriatingly humble zombie practitioner. Professional music ninja. Amateur tv scholar. Amateur internet advocate.

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